Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
May 25, 2012
Image Size
194 KB
Resolution
1008×756
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
1,508 (1 today)
Favourites
15 (who?)
Comments
18
Downloads
304

Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon PowerShot A640
Shutter Speed
1/60 second
Aperture
F/2.8
Focal Length
7 mm
Date Taken
May 21, 2012, 11:46:38 PM
Software
Adobe Photoshop CS2 Windows
Sensor Size
2mm
×
Forging Table Legs with Jig by ou8nrtist2 Forging Table Legs with Jig by ou8nrtist2
So, I got a commission to make a simple but sturdy table base to feature a VERY expensive antique slab of stone.The major difficulty was the legs had a sort of dog leg and would require four bends.Here is the jig I made to reproduce the 4 legs from 1" solid round stock,and my partner making the last of four bends.If you look closely you can see the two outer crescent shapes in the form are attached by bolts so that they can be removed to get them out of the way for the first two inner bends which are done with the same heat.Hope that helps to make sense of the image.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconda-vinch:
Da-Vinch Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2013  Professional Artisan Crafter
what a great set up. Sometimes some processes take so much jig work. I've done a bit of metal work but not on this scale. Great photos of this process. Thanks.
Reply
:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2013  Professional
I'm so lucky that my best friend has a COMPLETE blacksmith's shop with three functional trip hammers of different weights...
Reply
:iconmeflyingfree:
MeFlyingFree Featured By Owner May 25, 2012  Professional General Artist
I would love to work like this! I really appreciate your showing the processes you use! It makes the end piece that much better!
Reply
:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner May 25, 2012  Professional
I took these process shots partially to explain to the client what I had to do to make the piece.He was pretty much clueless.
Reply
:iconmeflyingfree:
MeFlyingFree Featured By Owner May 25, 2012  Professional General Artist
hahaha! I find that quite common when I am trying to explain what I do and how I do it!
Reply
:icondarkprince1976:
darkprince1976 Featured By Owner May 25, 2012  Professional Photographer
what i wouldnt give to have a workshop like that myself!
Reply
:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner May 25, 2012  Professional
It is indeed well stocked.My partner is a licensed contractor,but also an excellent blacksmith and sculptor.My own shop is a fabrication studio,where all the various parts come together and are assembled via welding mostly.And I do allot of stainless steel work which my partner doesn't do generally.So we have a symbiotic relationship in helping each other with our projects.
A studio like this doesn't just materialize by magic.
When I first started out I worked as a welder in a trailer factory and took 5% of every paycheck for 6 years and spent it on tools for my own shop at home.At the end of that 6 year period I was ready to begin freelance metalwork...
Reply
:iconkuzy62:
kuzy62 Featured By Owner May 25, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I love seeing this kinds of in-process photos....Nice jig!!! I worked in a welding shop when I was a kid and the guys all had built rigs like this....for when they needed the same type of piece over and over and they needed to be identical....thanks for sharing!!!!
Reply
:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner May 25, 2012  Professional
Oh good,that's why I posted it.
There's no end to creative devices and home made tools in the blacksmiths realm.What i do is sort of a crossover technique and use both modern and ancient techniques to make my art...
Reply
:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner May 25, 2012  Professional
Norsemin,
I am here to answer questions.Metal fabricated art is so technique driven that complete explanations provide valuable info on how a piece is actually made,something I fear is largely missing here on DA and the REAL way learning takes place.It is in discussion and by answering questions that the viewers can figure out how a piece is made.In this case I posted the jig so folks can understand this is one way to reproduce forged parts that need to be (nearly) identical.
Yes the curves are cut from a heavy pipe.
The strange bar next to the hammer was just a wrench with a tapered handle that was just the right fit for the shim or wedge we needed to make sure the hot bar was locked in place as we bent it and could not move.
Reply
Add a Comment: